Marketing/Writing

Cop an Attitude If You Want To Write

Posted by M. Sharon Baker
Cop an Attitude If You Want To Write

Don Murray coverDonald Murray, one of America’s greatest writing teachers, says, to adopt certain attitudes if you want to write.

My favorite out of the several he describes is:

Each contribution is merely that, a contribution to the conversation.

It is not, and does not have to be, the definitive work encompassing everything. Don’t be paralyzed by creating the ultimate truth.

Instead, Murray says:

  • Speculate
  • Question
  • Argue
  • Create a model
  • Take a position
  • Define a problem
  • Make an observation
  • Propose a solution
  • Illuminate a possibility

 

That’s good advice that applies not only to an academic looking to publish, as Murray proposes in the book The Essential Don Murray, but to marketers, freelance writers and others struggling to create blog posts, eBooks, articles or white papers.

 

Please share any great writing advice you’ve learned so I and others can benefit in the comments below.

 

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How To/Social Media/Websites

Every Marketer Needs This Social Media Cheat Sheet

Posted by M. Sharon Baker

Thanks to Bob Dunn, a very helpful WordPress Guru, I learned about Christopher Carfi’s 2016 Social Media Cheat Sheet, which outlines the most recent image sizes for Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, Instagram, Pinterest – you name it.

Check out Christopher’s post on the GoDaddy blog, and make sure to bookmark it.

There is also a great bonus – links to other resources to help make sizing images much easier.

Thank you Bob and Chris.

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A Writer's Life/Behind the Words/Writing

What I’ve been Reading: Books on Writing Well

Posted by M. Sharon Baker
What I’ve been Reading: Books on Writing Well

Living within walking distance to a university has many benefits, including acceBooks for postss to a large library and a college bookstore.

When I went with my daughter to buy books for fall semester, I browsed the bookstore stacks and found two books on my wish list I thought were out of print: Ogilvy on Advertising and Hey Whipple, Squeeze This.

If I remember correctly,  well known copywriter Bob Bly  mentioned those two books long ago, and that’s how they landed on my radar.

Any writer working with commercial clients should pick up a copy of Luke Sullivan’s Hey Whipple – it’s full of how-to’s for coming up with and refining ideas, looking at things from a different perspective, and writing for television, radio, print and social media.

Finding it was timely for me because I recently landed an assignment writing a brochure, something I haven’t done in a while. The book has earned a place next to Roy Peter Clark’s books on my primary writing reference shelf. I’m re-reading a book from that shelf as well: Jack Hart’s Storycraft. I’m knee-deep in a developing profile article and Jack’s advice on narrative storytelling has given me many angles to consider as I pull the many pieces together.

CWU small I also added To Show and To Tell by Phillip Lopate, but it is seemingly more academic and harder to read.

Stephen King’s On Writing has made many a writer’s recommendation list so when I saw a copy at my local bookstore, I bought it.

The first part is autobiographical and the second contains pointers on writing – many I’ve heard before but not quite in the same way.

I haven’t cracked Ogilvy on Advertising yet, but I will have to soon as it, Storycraft and Hey Whipple could  soon be on my other daughter’s required reading list since she’s a comm major at Murrow.

 

Tell me – what have you been reading lately?

 

 

 

 

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